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Learn insights from workplace leaders to writing a Thanksgiving letter to employees that they will remember. Download this new FREE eBook by clicking the image above.


It’s November, and that means the holiday season of gratitude is here! Seize the opportunity to honor and celebrate with your staff — write a Thanksgiving letter to employees this month.
Writing Thank You notes is a practice shared by many of the most successful CEOs in business, like Campbell Soup Company’s Doug Conant and Pepsi’s CEO Indra Nooyi.
But you don’t have to be the CEO of a Fortune 500 company to write the kind of Thank You letter that employees tell their families about and remember for years to come.
We are excited to introduce our new eBook“Put the ‘Thanks’ in Thanksgiving: How to Write a Thanksgiving Letter to Employees”, the perfect resource for inspiring your Thanksgiving letter to employees this holiday season. Download this FREE eBook for step-by-step tips and lessons from real-life examples from workplace leaders.
This free eBook is for you — whether you’re an HR manager in charge of employee holiday gifts, a C-suite executive seeking practical advice for a company-wide Thanksgiving mailing, or a location manager who wants to hand-write individual Thank You cards to the whole team.
Writing a memorable Thanksgiving letter to employees is one of the most valuable and appreciated ways to show your gratitude to employees.

The Simple Power of ‘Thank You’

Learn tips to writing a Thanksgiving letter to employees they'll value and remember.Doug Conant is a legendary thanker. While leading Campbell Soup through a dramatic turn-around, he wrote more than 30,000 handwritten Thank You notes to staffers and clients.
Conant’s all-too-unusual practice helped create “a company-wide culture of gratitude,” according to Business Insider.
His dedication to gratitude was almost certainly a factor in Campbell Soup’s reinvention and renewed success under his leadership from 2001 to 2011.
“It’s worth mentioning that when Conant took the reins at Campbell Soup, the stock price was falling and it was the worst performer of all the major food companies in the world … By 2009, the company was ahead of the S&P Food Group and the S&P 500,” Business Insider’s Shana Lebowitz writes.
“Bottom line: showing gratitude can motivate your team to work harder, and you probably aren’t showing enough right now,” she concludes.
In a must-read editorial for Harvard Business Review, Conant himself explains his management strategy as a marriage of “tough-minded performance standards with tender-heartedness.”
Conant was an inspiration to Janice Kaplan, the journalist who studied gratitude for her New York Times bestseller “The Gratitude Diaries.” She found that Conant’s enthusiasm for thanking employees is not shared by many executives — and they’re missing out:

“As I was researching this book, I heard over and over from executives the line, ‘Hey, we say thank you with a paycheck.’ Well, guess what? You don’t say Thank You with a paycheck. You say ‘I’m paying you’ with a paycheck. You say Thank You with Thank You.”

Put the ‘Thanks’ in Thanksgiving — Get Started with our FREE eBook!

A true culture of gratitude happens day in and day out. It’s a year-round process.
But culture is also reinforced by the rituals of our celebrations — and that’s especially true in the workplace.
Thanksgiving is the American holiday of gratitude that unites us all. (Want to know more about the fascinating history of Thanksgiving traditions? Read our interview earlier this month with Melanie Kirkpatrick, author of “Thanksgiving: The Holiday at the Heart of the American Experience.”)
A Thanksgiving letter to employees lets your staff know you’re thinking of them during this symbolic holiday and grateful for their dedication. By recognizing and honoring a holiday they celebrate with their families, you’re acknowledging them as people first, not just as employees.
Grateful leadership has a ripple effect on employee engagement, inspiring better morale, higher quality and lower turnover. And one of the simplest ways you can become a more grateful leader is through a Thanksgiving letter to employees.
If you’re out of practice, writing Thank You notes can be challenging. But you’re not alone! We all feel gratitude, and love being on the receiving end of it, but the workplace is one of the last places gratitude gets expressed.
The good news is it’s easy to break from this status quo and start a Thank You habit — and what better time to start than this Thanksgiving?
You don’t have to be a creative writer, or devote hours to crafting the perfect note. We share the secrets to writing a thoughtful Thank You note that employees will value and remember.
Our eBook guides you through the process. You’ll learn:

  • The business case for sharing a Thanksgiving “Thank You”
  • Real-life examples of memorable Thanksgiving letters from bosses in a variety of industries.
  • Best practices for thanking employees and ideas for brainstorming your own unique approach.
  • Tips on how to share your Thanksgiving letter.

 
Why wait? Download your free copy now!

Download FREE eBook, How to Write a Thanksgiving Letter to Employees Now!

We hope you love our new eBook and find it full of helpful inspiration and advice. Best wishes for a happy and peaceful Thanksgiving from all of us at gThankYou.

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